INFO39599
Capstone Project for CET/EET
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  I: Administrative Information   II: Course Details   III: Topical Outline(s)  Printable Version
 
Section I: Administrative Information
  Total hours: 84.0
Credit Value: 6.0
Credit Value Notes: Courses may be offered in other formats.
Effective: Fall 2019
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A
Equivalents: N/A

Pre/Co/Equiv Notes: Prerequisite: INFO34717

Program(s): Computer Engineering Technolog, Electronics Engineering Techno
Program Coordinator(s): MD - Nazrul Islam Khan, Weijing Ma
Course Leader or Contact: Shirook Ali
Version:
20190903_00
Status: Approved (APPR)

Section I Notes: N/A

 
 
Section II: Course Details

Detailed Description
In this sixth semester course, the students combine the skills and knowledge accumulated in their program to conduct design and development projects. With guidance and mentoring, the student develops a working prototype exhibiting many aspects of circuit analysis and design, micro-controller applications, digital hardware and software design, programming, data acquisition, system control, and communication. The students demonstrate their proficiency and competency in the learning objectives established in their program by the Faculty of Applied Science and Technology.The course embodies project management, design and development, technical documentation, oral presentation, and teamwork, as essential training for success in today's business environment.During the prerequisite Capstone Research course (INFO37545), the students conduct research and submit a formal Project Proposal for consideration as their final project topic. Within this Capstone Project course, the students complete development and implementation of their prototype system, formally present their work and submit a formal Technical Report.

Program Context

 
Computer Engineering Technolog Program Coordinator(s): Weijing Ma
The purpose of this sixth semester course is to combine skills and knowledge developed in numerous courses the student has taken. The background research aspect of the project is supported by the Capstone Project Research course. The skills and knowledge to conduct the project are supported by numerous analog and digital courses, microcontroller applications and computer programming. Graduates of the Programs enter the Engineering Technology workforce in a variety of innovative roles including research, design and development, problem solving, and manufacturing. In this mandatory course, students complete a final year project that demonstrates understanding and competency in many relevant subject areas of the Programs.

Electronics Engineering Techno Program Coordinator(s): MD - Nazrul Islam Khan
The purpose of this sixth semester course is to combine skills and knowledge developed in numerous courses the student has taken. The background research aspect of the project is supported by the Capstone Project Research course. The skills and knowledge to conduct the project are supported by numerous analog and digital courses, microcontroller applications and computer programming. Graduates of the Programs enter the Engineering Technology workforce in a variety of innovative roles including research, design and development, problem solving, and manufacturing. In this mandatory course, students complete a final year project that demonstrates understanding and competency in many relevant subject areas of the Programs.


Course Critical Performance and Learning Outcomes

  Critical Performance:
By the end of this course, students will have demonstrated the ability to design, develop, test, troubleshoot, document and present a technical project relevant to their program.
 
Learning Outcomes:

To achieve the critical performance, students will have demonstrated the ability to:

  1. Estabish project-specific design criteria based on research and analysis of data and information.
  2. Analyze a current business or societal problem in computer/electronics engineering area.
  3. Use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for applied research and design practice to evaluate different options and trade-offs and solve existing problems.
  4. Utilize project management skills to plan, evaluate and deliver all necessary elements to successfully complete the project.
  5. Create and design all necessary specifications, schematic drawings, diagrams, and parts list, to complete the project.
  6. Execute all necessary coding, testing and troubleshooting, to complete the project.
  7. Develop a final working prototype based on sound computer and electronics engineering principles and judgement.
  8. Work in multi-disciplinary teams that may include participating in consulting with fellow students, professionals, business contacts, professors, etc.
  9. Prepare and maintain parts inventories and installation records.

Evaluation Plan
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:

 Evaluation Plan: IN-CLASS
 Project Management10.0%
 Written Reports (Deliverables #1, #3, #4, and #7)40.0%
 Oral Presentations (Deliverables #2, and #5)20.0%
 Evaluation of Working Prototype (Deliverable #6)30.0%
Total100.0%

Evaluation Notes and Academic Missed Work Procedure:
(The School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering & Technology is abbreviated as MEET in this outline.)
  1. MEET MISSED EVALUATIONS PROCESS:
    Missed evaluations will result in a grade of zero. See the process document and Verification of Injury or Illness Form posted on the Student Success in Engineering Virtual Community page on SLATE.

  2. MEET LATE ASSIGNMENT POLICY:
    Assignments and Lab Reports are due as advised by the instructor. Late submission will attract a 10% deduction per day, to a maximum of 30%. Assignments submitted after 3 days late will be awarded a grade of zero.
Project Management - 10% - Use of appropriate project management methods to accurately plan and monitor project scopes, work breakdown, milestones, and resources and responsibilities, to successfully complete the project. - Teams are expected to keep an up-to-date Project Log reviewed by their faculty advisor and to demonstrate consistent effort, effective use of class time, regular attendance, meeting short-term goals, and keeping up with documentation, etc. Deliverable #1 - 5% - Written report to document project objectives and description, and design specifications, with details of project management plan; scope definition, team formation with members confirmed, work breakdown and task assignments, resource planning, project schedule with milestones, etc. Deliverable #2 - 10% - Oral presentation of the project progress. - Detail discussion on project definition, progress made, problems encountered and solutions developed, resource and time management, any revision to the project scope, and future plan. Deliverable #3 - 10% - Written project progress with detail documentation of project definition, progress made, problems encountered and solutions developed, parts list and status of procurement, schematic diagrams developed, resource and time management, any revision to the project scope, and future plan. Deliverable #4 - 5% - Formatting the skeleton elements of the final written report; title page, project summary, table of contents, introduction, and appendix. - Detail documentation of background information and research, project objectives, project description, project scope definition, design criteria, etc. - The appendix includes parts list, schematic drawings, block diagrams, pictures, and datasheets, etc. Deliverable #5 - 10% - Final oral presentation of the project. - Detail discussion on project definition, design and development, problems encountered and solutions developed, resource and time managemwnr, conclusions, and suggestions for further improvement. Deliverable #6 - 30% - Final open-house demonstration of the working prototype. - To be evaluated for 'working condition' and completeness of the prototype in meeting the project scope defined, as well as the quality of presentation. Deliverable #7 - 20% - Final written documentation of the project with detailed documentation of background information and research, project definition, design and development, problems encountered and solutions provided, conclusions, and suggestions for further improvement, as well as appendix of schematic diagrams, pictures and drawings, bill of materials, datasheets, and programming code. ** Students will be penalized up to 10% of the marks on all assignments for improper use of English. Additionally, poorly written work with the exception of the final examination may be returned without grading. If resubmission of the work is permitted, it may be graded with marks deducted for poor English and/or late submission.**

Provincial Context
The course meets the following Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities requirements:

 

Essential Employability Skills
Essential Employability Skills emphasized in the course:

  • Communication Skills - Communicate clearly, concisely and correctly in the written, spoken, visual form that fulfills the purpose and meets the needs of the audience.
  • Communication Skills - Respond to written, spoken, or visual messages in a manner that ensures effective communication.
  • Numeracy - Execute mathematical operations accurately.
  • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving Skills - Use a variety of thinking skills to anticipate and solve problems.
  • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving - Apply a systematic approach to solve problems.
  • Personal Skills - Manage the use of time and other resources to complete projects.
  • Interpersonal Skills - Show respect for the diverse opinions, values, belief systems, and contributions of others.
  • Interpersonal Skills - Interact with others in groups or teams in ways that contribute to effective working relationships and the achievement of goals.
  • Information Management Skills - Analyze, evaluate, and apply relevant information from a variety of sources.
  • Personal Skills - Take responsibility for one's own actions, decisions, and consequences.
  • Information Management - Locate, select, organize and document information using appropriate technology and information systems.

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition
PLAR Contact (if course is PLAR-eligible) - Office of the Registrar

Students may apply to receive credit by demonstrating achievement of the course learning outcomes through previous relevant work/life experience, service, self-study and training on the job. This course is eligible for challenge through the following method(s):

  • Other
    Notes:  
  • Portfolio and Interview
    Notes:  

 
 
Section III: Topical Outline
Some details of this outline may change as a result of circumstances such as weather cancellations, College and student activities, and class timetabling.
Instruction Mode: In-Class
Professor: Multiple Professors
Resource(s):
 TypeDescription
OptionalOtherOn-line references include research material available on the web, supporting documentation posted on SLATE, standard research writing guidelines (specifically OACETT, IEEE and MLA Style Guides)

Applicable student group(s): Computer Engineering Technology students
Course Details:

The student develops a working prototype exhibiting many aspects of
circuit analysis and design, micro-controller applications, digital
hardware and software design, programming, data acquisition, system
control, and communication.  Students are expected to show
application of appropriate skills and knowledge from their program in
planning and conducting the project.

Module 1:

Course introduction and overview.

Module 2:

Project scope definition and project management plan.

Module 3:

Project proposals finalized, approved and documented.
(Submit Deliverable #1)

Module 4:

Project team design and development meetings.

Module 5:

Project team design and development meetings.

Module 6:

Project team design and development meetings.

Module 7:

Project progress presentation and mid-term evaluation.
(Submit Deliverable #2 and #3)

Module 8:

Revision to Project plan, based on Mid-term Evaluation.

Module 9:

Project team design and development meetings.

Module 10:

Project team design and development meetings.
(Submit Deliverable #4)

Module 11:

Project team design and development meetings.

Module 12:

Project team design and development meetings.

Module 13:

In-class oral presentation of the final project status.
(Deliverable #5)

Module 14:

Open-house demonstration of working prototypes (Deliverable #6)
Submit the final written report.  (Deliverable #7)

Project Teams:

Typically, the students are working in a team of 2 to 3 students.
The maximum size of a team is four students.  Special permission is
required for larger teams.  Since teamwork is an essential component
of the learning outcomes, students are not encouraged to work alone
on their project.

Consultation:

Students are encouraged to discuss problems with the instructor and
their faculty advisors.  Consultations outside of the classroom with
potential business partners or clients are very much encouraged.

Class Times:

Students are expected to attend all classes for planning and
laboratory sessions.  Assigned class times should be spent
effectively on working on the project, meeting with advisors,
preparing for the deliverables, and carrying out activities related
to the design.  Habitual absence from the assigned classes affects
the final grade.


Sheridan Policies

All Sheridan policies can be viewed on the Sheridan policy website.

Academic Integrity: The principle of academic integrity requires that all work submitted for evaluation and course credit be the original, unassisted work of the student. Cheating or plagiarism including borrowing, copying, purchasing or collaborating on work, except for group projects arranged and approved by the professor, or otherwise submitting work that is not the student's own, violates this principle and will not be tolerated. Students who have any questions regarding whether or not specific circumstances involve a breach of academic integrity are advised to review the Academic Integrity Policy and procedure and/or discuss them with the professor.

Copyright: A majority of the course lectures and materials provided in class and posted in SLATE are protected by copyright. Use of these materials must comply with the Acceptable Use Policy, Use of Copyright Protected Work Policy and Student Code of Conduct. Students may use, copy and share these materials for learning and/or research purposes provided that the use complies with fair dealing or an exception in the Copyright Act. Permission from the rights holder would be necessary otherwise. Please note that it is prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own on third-party commercial websites including but not limited to Course Hero or OneNote. It is also prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own or your own work with the intent to assist others in cheating on third-party commercial websites including but not limited to Course Hero or OneNote.

Intellectual Property: Sheridan's Intellectual Property Policy generally applies such that students own their own work. Please be advised that students working with external research and/or industry collaborators may be asked to sign agreements that waive or modify their IP rights. Please refer to Sheridan's IP Policy and Procedure.

Respectful Behaviour: Sheridan is committed to provide a learning environment that supports academic achievement by respecting the dignity, self-esteem and fair treatment of every person engaged in the learning process. Behaviour which is inconsistent with this principle will not be tolerated. Details of Sheridan's policy on Harassment and Discrimination, Academic Integrity and other academic policies are available on the Sheridan policy website.

Accessible Learning: Accessible Learning coordinates academic accommodations for students with disabilities. For more information or to register, please see the Accessible Learning website (Statement added September 2016)

Course Outline Changes: The information contained in this Course Outline including but not limited to faculty and program information and course description is subject to change without notice. Any changes to course curriculum and/or assessment shall adhere to approved Sheridan protocol. Nothing in this Course Outline should be viewed as a representation, offer and/or warranty. Students are responsible for reading the Important Notice and Disclaimer which applies to Programs and Courses.


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