HIST19936G
Canada in the Making: Understanding Canadian History
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  I: Administrative Information   II: Course Details   III: Topical Outline(s)  Printable Version
 
Section I: Administrative Information
  Total hours: 42.0
Credit Value: 3.0
Credit Value Notes: n/a
Effective: Spring/Summer 2016
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A
Equivalents:
N/A
Pre/Co/Equiv Notes: n/a

Program(s): Cross College Courses
Program Coordinator(s): Sarah Sinclair
Course Leader or Contact: Christian Knudsen
Version:
10.0
Status: Approved (APPR)

Section I Notes: n/a

 
 
Section II: Course Details

Detailed Description
In this course, students explore the social, political, cultural and military tapestry that forms the basis of the Canadian multicultural society today. This course covers Canadian history from the Fur Trade to the Space Age, focusing on the complexities of Canadian society in a historical context. Through the study of Canadian politics, culture and military involvement, students learn about the range and variety of experiences that form the Canadian consciousness. The course provides students opportunity to analyse how various trends in Canadian history interact and have influenced each other over time. Through interactive lectures, group activities, group projects and discussions, students evaluate the successes and failures of various social/political/military experiences and experiments throughout Canadian history.

Program Context

 
Cross College Courses Program Coordinator: Sarah Sinclair
This course is part of the General Education curriculum which is designed to contribute to the development of the students' consciousness of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience; their ability to establish meaning through this consciousness; and, as a result, their ability to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work. General Education courses strengthen students' generic skills, such as critical analysis, problem solving, and communication, in the context of an exploration of topics with broad-based personal and/or societal importance.


Course Critical Performance and Learning Outcomes

 
 Critical Performance

By the end of this course, students will have demonstrated the 
ability to analyse changing trends in Canadian politics, military 
commitments, and society.

Learning Outcomes

To achieve the critical performance, students will have demonstrated 
the ability to:

1.  Analyse the roots of various cultural, social and political  
    trends in Canadian history using a variety of media such as  
    newspapers, television, books and the internet.
2.  Analyze the basic evolutionary structure and the major themes,           
    events, and figures of Canadian history from the arrival of the
    first peoples to the present.
3.  Distinguish how various trends in Canadian history interact and 
    influence each other over time.
4.  Describe the Canadian historical experience in the context of  
    global historical developments. 
5.  Identify how each of these trends impacts the daily lives of  
    contemporary Canadians.

Evaluation Plan
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:

 
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:

Essay                          = 20%
Group Presentation             = 20%
Midterm Test                   = 20%                         
Heritage Assignment            = 15%              
Final Exam                     = 25%

TOTAL                          =100%

----------------------------------------------------------------------

TEST AND ASSIGNMENT PROTOCOL  
 
To encourage behaviours that will help students to be successful in 
the workplace and to ensure that students receive credit for their 
individual work, the following rules apply to every course offered 
within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.  
            
1. Students are responsible for staying abreast of test dates and 
   times, as well as due dates and any special instructions for 
   submitting assignments and projects as supplied to the class by 
   the Professor.
2. Students must write all tests at the specified times. Missed 
   tests, in-class activities, assignments and presentations are 
   awarded a mark of zero.  If an extension or make-up opportunity is 
   approved by the professor as outlined below, the mark of zero may 
   be revised by subsequent performance.  The penalty for late 
   submission of written assignments is a loss of 10% per day for up 
   to five business days (excluding weekends and statutory holidays), 
   after which, a grade of zero is assigned. Business days include 
   any day that the college is open for business, whether the student 
   has scheduled classes that day or not.  
3. Students, who miss a test or in-class activity or assignment or 
   fail to submit an assignment on time due to exceptional 
   circumstances, are required to notify their professor in advance 
   of the class whenever possible.  A make-up test may be supplied 
   for students who provide an acceptable explanation of their 
   absence and/or acceptable documentation explaining their absence 
   (e.g., a medical certificate). All make-up tests are to be written 
   at a time and place specified by the professor upon the student's 
   return.  Alternately, students may be given an opportunity to earn 
   the associated marks by having a subsequent test count for the 
   additional marks. Exceptional circumstances may result in a 
   modification of due dates for assignments.
4. Unless otherwise specified, assignments and projects must be 
   submitted at the beginning of class. 
5. Students must complete every assignment as an individual effort  
   Unless, the professor specifies otherwise.
6. Since there may be instances of grade appeal or questions 
   regarding the timely completion of assignments and/or extent of 
   individual effort, etc., students are strongly advised to keep, 
   and make available to their professor, if requested, a copy of all 
   assignments and working notes until the course grade has been 
   finalized.  
7. There will be no resubmission of work unless this has been 
   previously agreed to or suggested by the professor. 
8. Students must submit all assignments in courses with practical lab 
   and field components in order to pass the course.
Provincial Context
The course meets the following Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities requirements:

 

Essential Employability Skills
Essential Employability Skills emphasized in the course:

X Communication X Critical Thinking & Problem Solving X Interpersonal
  Numeracy X Information Management   Personal

Notes: N/A

General Education
This General Education course relates to the following themes as specified by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.

  Arts In Society X Civic Life
  Social and Cultural Understanding   Science and Technology
  Personal Understanding    

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition
PLAR Contact (if course is PLAR-eligible) : Office of the Registrar

Students may apply to receive credit by demonstrating achievement of the course learning outcomes through previous relevant work/life experience, service, self-study and training on the job. This course is eligible for challenge through the following method(s):

Challenge Exam Portfolio Interview Other Not Eligible for PLAR
X X      

Notes:  Both a challenge exam and portfolio are required.

 
 
Section III: Topical Outline
Some details of this outline may change as a result of circumstances such as weather cancellations, College and student activities, and class timetabling.
Effective term: Spring/Summer 2016
Professor: Multiple Professors
Textbook(s):
Conrad, Margaret (2012) Canada: A Concise History. Cambridge University 
Press

Applicable student group(s): General Education Elective
Course Details:
Unit 1: Introduction

Topics:
-Introduction to the Course and Instructor
-Distribution and Discussion of Course Outline
-Introduction to Primary and Secondary sources
-Introduction to Public History and the Heritage Minute Assignment

Readings:
Conrad, Introduction
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 2: Pre-Confederation Canada: First Nations 

Topics:
-The Arrival of Humans in the Americas
-The First Nations of Canada and their Territories
-The History of the First Nations to 1500

Readings:
Conrad, ch. 1 
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 3: Pre-Confederation Canada: The Arrival of Europeans

Topics:
-Early European Explorations and the Fur Trade
-French Domination and Settlement to 1663

Readings:
Conrad, ch. 2
Heritage Assignment (15%)

______________________________________________________________________
Unit 4: Pre-Confederation Canada: The French in the Americas (1661-
1763)

Topics:
-French Political and Military Domination from 1663 to 1763
-Religion, Society and Day-to-Day Life Under French Rule
-The Seven Year's War and British Victory

Readings:
Conrad, ch. 3
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 5: Pre-Confederation Canada: The English Domination of Canada
(1763-1821)

Topics:
-Political Changes under the English
-Society and Culture under English Control
-Natives and the Fur Trade in the West

Readings
Conrad, ch. 4

Group Presentations (20%)
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 6: The Road to Confederation and Nationhood: The Hopes of a New
Political Consciousness (1815-1885)

Topics:
-Rebellions, Reform and Responsible Government in the English Colonies
-Society and Culture of the English Colonies
-Confederation and the British North America Act
-Early Nation-Building (1867-1896)

Readings:
Conrad, ch. 5-6
Group Presentations (20%)

MID-TERM TEST (20%)
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 7: The Invention of a Canadian Identity (1885-1914)

Topics:
-Three Powerful Prime Ministers: John A. Macdonald, Wilfrid Laurier 
and Robert Borden
-The New Industrial Order
-The Society and Culture of the Young Dominion
-Canadian Military Policies before the Great War

Readings:
Conrad,ch. 7
Group Presentations (20%)
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 8: The Era of the First World War: Canada Comes of Age (1914-
1919)

Topics:
-Canadian Military Campaigns
-Women and Industrial Labour, and the Vote
-The Winnipeg General Strike and the Dangers of Veterans' 
Reintegration

Readings:
Conrad,p. 194-202
Group Presentations (20%)
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 9: The Interwar Period (1920-1939)

Topics:
-Postwar Boom, the Great Depression and Reform
-Mass Consumer Society and the Search for a New Identity
-The Changing Political Landscape


Readings:
Conrad, p. 202-216

Group Presentations (20%)
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 10: The Second World War: Canada's War at the Front and at Home
(1939-1945)

Topics:
-Canada and the European Campaigns
-The Ugly Face of Conscription
-Women and Wartime Production
-Propaganda and Censorship

Readings:
Conrad, p.216-225

Group Presentations (20%)
Essay due (20%)
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 11: Canada and the Post-War World: Liberalism Triumphant (1945-
1984)

Topics:
-The Rights Revolution
-The Canadian State (1945-75
-Growth at All Costs 
-Community & Nation 

Readings:
Conrad, ch.9

Group Presentations (20%)
______________________________________________________________________
Unit 12: Contemporary Canada (1984-2011)

Topics:
-The Politics of Uncertainty 
-Economic Life in Neo-Liberal Canada
-Community and Culture (1976-2011)
-Review for the Exam

Readings:
Conrad, ch.10


FINAL EXAM (25%)

______________________________________________________________________

Sheridan Policies
The principle of academic integrity requires that all work submitted 
for evaluation and course credit be the original, unassisted work of 
the student. Cheating or plagiarism including borrowing, copying, 
purchasing or collaborating on work, except for group projects 
arranged and approved by the professor, or otherwise submitting work 
that is not the student's own violates this principle and will not be 
tolerated. Students who have any questions regarding whether or not 
specific circumstances involve a breach of academic integrity are 
advised to review the Academic Integrity Policy and
Procedure and/or discuss them with the professor.

Sheridan is committed to Academic Integrity. In this course the 
professor has chosen to require students to use Turnitin to check 
their own written work to ensure originality.
- By taking this course students agree that they will submit written 
work for this course to Turnitin for text comparison.
- Students will have the opportunity to review their initial work and 
correct any issues identified by Turnitin prior to submitting their 
final work.
- Students will include the final Originality Report as a part of the 
written work submission.
- Students are encouraged to discuss the Originality Report at any 
time with their faculty member.
- Assignments submitted to Turnitin will be included as source 
documents in Turnitin.com's restricted access database, solely for the 
purpose of detecting text copying.

Sheridan is committed to provide a learning environment that supports 
academic achievement by respecting the dignity, self-esteem and fair 
treatment of every person engaged in the learning process. Behaviour 
which is inconsistent with this principle will not be tolerated. 
Details of Sheridan's policy on Harassment and Discrimination, 
Academic Integrity, and other academic policies are available on the 
Sheridan policy website.

The information contained in this Course Outline including but not 
limited to faculty and program information and course description is 
subject to change without notice. Any changes to course curriculum 
and/or assessment shall adhere to approved Sheridan protocol. Nothing 
in this Course Outline should be viewed as a representation, offer 
and/or warranty. Students are responsible for reading the Important 
Notice and Disclaimer which applies to Programs and Courses.

Copyright  Sheridan College. All rights reserved.


Sheridan Policies

All Sheridan policies can be viewed on the Sheridan policy website.

Academic Integrity: The principle of academic integrity requires that all work submitted for evaluation and course credit be the original, unassisted work of the student. Cheating or plagiarism including borrowing, copying, purchasing or collaborating on work, except for group projects arranged and approved by the professor, or otherwise submitting work that is not the student's own, violates this principle and will not be tolerated. Students who have any questions regarding whether or not specific circumstances involve a breach of academic integrity are advised to review the Academic Integrity Policy and procedure and/or discuss them with the professor.

Copyright: A majority of the course lectures and materials provided in class and posted in SLATE are protected by copyright. Use of these materials must comply with the Acceptable Use Policy, Use of Copyright Protected Work Policy and Student Code of Conduct. Students may use, copy and share these materials for learning and/or research purposes provided that the use complies with fair dealing or an exception in the Copyright Act. Permission from the rights holder would be necessary otherwise. Please note that it is prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own on third-party commercial websites including but not limited to Course Hero or OneNote. It is also prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own or your own work with the intent to assist others in cheating on third-party commercial websites including but not limited to Course Hero or OneNote.

Intellectual Property: Sheridan's Intellectual Property Policy generally applies such that students own their own work. Please be advised that students working with external research and/or industry collaborators may be asked to sign agreements that waive or modify their IP rights. Please refer to Sheridan's IP Policy and Procedure.

Respectful Behaviour: Sheridan is committed to provide a learning environment that supports academic achievement by respecting the dignity, self-esteem and fair treatment of every person engaged in the learning process. Behaviour which is inconsistent with this principle will not be tolerated. Details of Sheridan's policy on Harassment and Discrimination, Academic Integrity and other academic policies are available on the Sheridan policy website.

Accessible Learning: Accessible Learning coordinates academic accommodations for students with disabilities. For more information or to register, please see the Accessible Learning website (Statement added September 2016)

Course Outline Changes: The information contained in this Course Outline including but not limited to faculty and program information and course description is subject to change without notice. Any changes to course curriculum and/or assessment shall adhere to approved Sheridan protocol. Nothing in this Course Outline should be viewed as a representation, offer and/or warranty. Students are responsible for reading the Important Notice and Disclaimer which applies to Programs and Courses.


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Copyright © Sheridan College. All rights reserved.